irritate


irritate
irritate, exasperate, nettle, provoke, aggravate, rile, peeve are comparable when meaning to excite a feeling of angry annoyance in a person.
Something which irritates greatly displeases or offends and evokes a display of feeling ranging from momentary impatience to an outburst of rage
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the chattering crowd, with their rude jokes . . . irritated him sharply— Anderson

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her intensity, which would leave no emotion on a normal plane, irritated the youth into a frenzy— D. H. Lawrence

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Something which exasperates arouses bitter or intense irritation. The word, however, sometimes expresses nothing more than keen vexation or annoyance
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an opportunity to . . . aggravate his poor patient wife, and exasperate his children, and make himself generally obnoxious— Simeon Ford

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though she could exasperate she could never offend— H. G. Wells

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Something which nettles irritates sharply but momentarily and stings or piques more than angers
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a touch of light scorn in her voice nettled me—W. J. Locke

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Something which provokes awakens strong annoyance or vexation and often incites to action
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a Tory resident who provoked local animosities and was charged with high treason— A mer. Guide Series: Conn.

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they were definitely provoked to extremity before they did this deed— Ingamells

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he is provoked with me for not talking more— Burney

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Something which aggravates (see also INTENSIFY) arouses displeasure, impatience, or anger often through prolonged or repeated action
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nothing so aggravates an earnest person as a passive resistance— Melville

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it is aggravating to have you talking about so small a business— Shaw

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Something which riles disturbs one's serenity or peace and agitates as well as angers
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with raucous taunting and ribald remarks to rile up the proprietor— White

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Something which peeves excites often petty or querulous fretfulness or a tendency to be easily irritated
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he is easily peeved after a restless night

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when she ventured to criticize it, even mildly, he was peevedAuchincloss

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Analogous words: *annoy, vex, irk, bother: incense, *anger, madden, enrage, infuriate: *offend, affront: fret, chafe (see ABRADE)
Contrasted words: appease, mollify, conciliate, propitiate, placate, *pacify: gratify, *please, gladden, delight

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Irritate — Ir ri*tate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Irritated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Irritating}.] [L. irritatus, p. p. of irritare. Of doubtful origin.] [1913 Webster] 1. To increase the action or violence of; to heighten excitement in; to intensify; to stimulate.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • irritate — [ir′i tāt΄] vt. irritated, irritating [< L irritatus, pp. of irritare, to excite, stimulate, irritate < ir , in + IE base * erei , to excite, agitate > ROAM] 1. to excite to anger; provoke; annoy; exasperate 2. to cause (an organ or part …   English World dictionary

  • irritate — [v1] upset, anger abrade, affront, aggravate, annoy, bother, bug*, burn*, chafe, confuse, distemper, disturb, drive up the wall*, enrage, exasperate, fret, gall, get, get on nerves*, get under skin*, grate, harass, incense, inflame, infuriate,… …   New thesaurus

  • Irritate — Ir ri*tate, a. Excited; heightened. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Irritate — Ir ri*tate, v. t. [See 1 st {Irritant}.] To render null and void. [R.] Abp. Bramhall. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • irritate — I verb affront, aggravate, agitate, anger, annoy, badger, bother, bully, chafe, discompose, displease, disturb, enrage, exacerbate, exasperate, excite anger, excite impatience, fret, gall, give offense, grate, harass, hector, incense, inflame,… …   Law dictionary

  • irritate — (v.) 1530s, stimulate to action, rouse, incite, from L. irritatus, pp. of irritare excite, provoke. An earlier verb form was irrite (mid 15c.), from O.Fr. irriter. Meaning annoy, make impatient is from 1590s. Related: Irritated; irritating …   Etymology dictionary

  • irritate — ► VERB 1) make annoyed or angry. 2) cause inflammation in (a part of the body). DERIVATIVES irritating adjective irritation noun. ORIGIN Latin irritare …   English terms dictionary

  • irritate — irritator, n. /ir i tayt /, v., irritated, irritating. v.t. 1. to excite to impatience or anger; annoy. 2. Physiol., Biol. to excite (a living system) to some characteristic action or function. 3. Pathol. to bring (a body part) to an abnormally… …   Universalium

  • irritate */ — UK [ˈɪrɪteɪt] / US [ˈɪrɪˌteɪt] verb [transitive] Word forms irritate : present tense I/you/we/they irritate he/she/it irritates present participle irritating past tense irritated past participle irritated 1) to make someone feel annoyed or… …   English dictionary


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